Otoliths number twenty-nine

shades of rectangles

The new issue of Otoliths (a magazine of many e-things) is out, issue number twenty-nine, and both Paul Pfleuger, Jr. and myself have some new poems inside it:

pfleuger villain subjectPaul Pfleuger, Jr.

metz dronesScott Metz

Also of interest to R’r readers in the issue: Jack Galmitz has 8 visuals (one of which is the untitled piece up above), Camille Martin has 12 short poems, and Johannes S. H. Bjerg has two sequences and a visual.

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Marlene Mountain

sol12 copy

A couple weeks back, The Haiku Foundation began a new feature entitled Book of the Week, highlighting haiku collections of the past and shedding new light on them. A digging up and a re-introduction of sorts. Cool idea.

In honor of their first selection, Marlene Mountain’s groundbreaking collection, the old tin roof (1976), I thought it fitting to share here Jack Galmitz’s in depth essay on Mountain’s oeuvre, “then I must go to the Mountain: (space reserved) for Marlene Mountain,” which appeared in R’r 12.2.

To read a PDF of Jack Galmitz’s essay, click on the title here: then I must go to the Mountain.

To read Mountain’s the old tin roof in it’s entirety, part of The Haiku Foundation’s Digital Library, click here.

R’r 12.3

way mark harris R'r cover copy– click on the cover to read the issue as a flipbook –

– R’r 12.3 (downloadable PDF) –

. . .

scorpion prize 27 by Craig Dworkin

70+ new poems

Part I of an interview with translator Makoto Ueda

MASKS 4

3 essays by Jack Galmitz on the work of Robert Boldman, Richard Gilbert, & Mark Harris

& the announcement of a new section in R’r: homeland

submission deadline for 13.1 is April 1, 2013: scott@roadrunnerjournal.net

seekings

Perhaps the appraisal of Marlene Mountain that is most important of all comes from Haruo Shirane, author of the influential book Traces of Dreams: Landscape, Cultural Memory, and the Poetry of Bashō (Stanford University Press, 1998): in 2001, he wrote to her:

Dear Marlene,

I consider [William J.] Higginson to be a close friend and I admire his work greatly, but here I must offer a different opinion with regard to your work. Whether or not it fits some definition of haiku is of little relevance in the larger picture. The fact is that it is superior poetry, much superior to almost the entire body of what has been narrowly defined in North America as *haiku.* Bashō, like his great rival, Saikaku, felt that it was not form that counted, it was the poetry, the quality of the words, how it could move the reader. In their younger years, they broke all kinds of rules. Saikaku was criticized severely, and was told he was just *blowing dust.* But it was in the process of breaking rules that these poets often made their greatest poetic achievements. Great poets don’t stick to rules; they make their own. You belong in that company.

To put it another way, what was most important for Bashō was what was called *haikai spirit*, to be constantly seeking new horizons, new forms, new words, new emotions. In my view, you have that spirit.

Haruo Shirane (Columbia University)

 —

excerpted from Jack Galmitz’s essay “then I must go to the Mountain: (space reserved) for Marlene Mountain” (R’r 12.2), and can also be found in his collection of essays, Views (Cyberwit Press, 2012)

R’r 12.2

 —click on the image above to read the issue as a flipbook via issuu

OR

—DOWNLOAD A PDF DOCUMENT OF R’r 12.2 : 2012

cover: Masako Metz (2012)

scorpion prize 26 by Mark Wallace

* 78 ku *

two essays by Jack Galmitz:

then I must go to the Mountain: (space reserved) for Marlene Mountain

&

Descant: Dimitar Anakiev’s Rustic

*

submissions for 12.3 due by December 1st / send to: scott@roadrunnerjournal.net